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08/05/2022
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WorkScoop
The White House says the EPA will give local sanitation inspectors cyber oversight, but experts say that's a bad idea. Meta reveals details behind an operation against Russian trolls. And the Justice Department doesn't trust computer filing systems for sensitive cases. This is CyberScoop for Aug. 5.

Should sanitation inspectors have cyber responsibility?

A White House announcement that the Environmental Protection Agency will delegate cybersecurity regulation for state water utilities through local sanitation inspections is receiving a growing amount of pushback from industry groups and cybersecurity experts. The decision follows months of public dispute between the water sector and the EPA over how to adequately monitor the water supply for cyberthreats, an increasing concern following cyberattacks on water facilities in California and Florida. Suzanne Smalley has the story.


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Meta clowns Russian troll op Cyber Front Z

Cyber Front Z, a pro-Russian messaging operation with connections to the infamous Internet Research Agency, is "clumsy and largely ineffective — definitely not 'A team' work," security officials with Meta said Thursday. In its quarterly adversarial threat report, which also details the company's efforts around the world, the Meta security team shared details of its work to remove 45 Facebook accounts and 1,037 Instagram accounts just weeks after they came online. On Friday morning, the Cyber Front Z Telegram channel hit back at Meta, using a clown emoji and saying that "with such 'analytics,' the future of Zuckerberg's brainchild is unenviable." AJ Vicens reports.


DOJ relies on paper for highly sensitive cases

The Justice Department has filed its most sensitive court documents on paper since January 2021 to avoid any chance of a breach or vulnerability in electronic filing systems compromising its high stakes cases. In an interview this week, Deputy Assistant Attorney General for National Security Adam Hickey told CyberScoop the department implemented the policy last year but did not connect that change to any specific breach or cybersecurity event. However, the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts did reveal “an apparent compromise” of the court system’s electronic case files on Jan 6, 2021. Suzanne covers it.


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