CyberScoop's 2017 Top Women in Cybersecurity

In our inaugural list, we honor those who are upending the status quo.

top women in cybersecurity 2017 news

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Donna Dodson

by Shaun Waterman • 1 year ago

Donna Dodson has multiple roles at the National Institute of Standards and Technology — the U.S. government's premier measurement and testing laboratory.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Masha Sedova

by Patrick Howell O'Neill • 1 year ago

Masha Sedova co-founded Elevate Security, where she tests user behavior and puts them on campaigns to practice new security behavior.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Mischel Kwon

by Shaun Waterman • 1 year ago

Over a three-decade career in security, Mischel Kwon held a succession of increasingly highly-ranked technical leadership positions before founding MKACyber, a security consulting firm that assesses and builds security operations centers and runs a managed SOC service.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Kimber Dowsett

by Chris Bing • 1 year ago

Kimber Dowsett is a security architect for 18F, a specialized technology division within the General Services Administration, or GSA, that’s been called the U.S. government’s startup.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Niloofar Howe

by Greg Otto • 1 year ago

As Chief Strategy Officer for RSA, Niloofar Howe responsible for the health and direction of the business, as well as figuring out a way large incumbent companies like RSA can work with a broad set of companies to deliver on the changing needs of her customers.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Amanda Rousseau

by Patrick Howell O'Neill • 1 year ago

Amanda Rousseau's job puts her knee deep in the guts of malware. A research engineer at Endgame, Rousseau's history includes two years at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center as a malware reverse engineer and computer forensic examiner.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Suzanne Vautrinot

by Shaun Waterman • 1 year ago

Suzanne Vautrinot retired from the U.S. Air Force in Oct. 2013 as a major-general and commander of the 24th Air Force, where she'd been in charge of the USAF's cyber war-fighting capability.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Amelie Koran

by Greg Otto • 1 year ago

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Jessy Irwin

by Patrick Howell O'Neill • 1 year ago

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Ann Barron-DiCamillo

by Greg Otto • 1 year ago

Having spent time in both the public and private sector, Ann Barron-DiCamillo has a unique outlook on the way the greater cybersecurity community should work together.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: May Mitchell

by Joe Warminsky • 1 year ago

Building on a long career in cybersecurity, May Mitchell recently joined California-based Cylance, which helps businesses to predict malware attacks and prevent them from taking down critical assets, data and networks.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Whitney Merrill

by Chris Bing • 1 year ago

Federal Trade Commission lawyer Whitney Merrill was the first ever law student to be accepted into the National Science Foundation’s CyberCorps program.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Tarah Wheeler

by Greg Otto • 1 year ago

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Jeanette Hanna-Ruiz

by Patrick Howell O'Neill • 1 year ago

There's no organization in the universe quite like NASA. Jeanette Hanna-Ruiz is the chief information security officer at the agency.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Essye Miller

by Shaun Waterman • 1 year ago

Essye Miller was made the Pentagon's chief information security officer when she was appointed to the post of Defense Department deputy CIO for cybersecurity.

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Lesley Carhart

by Patrick Howell O'Neill • 1 year ago

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Bobbie Stempfley

by Greg Otto • 1 year ago

We live in an information age, yet collaboration and information sharing in information security still proves difficult. Bobbie Stempfley, director of cyber strategy implementation at the MITRE Corporation is busy trying to erase that difficulty,

Top Women in Cybersecurity: Amy Howland

by Chris Bing • 1 year ago

Protecting thousands of colleagues from getting hacked while at work everyday can be a difficult job, and even more so when a newly created computer network is added to the mix, but that’s exactly what CSRA’s Chief Information Security Officer Amy Howland has done.

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