Sean Lyngaas

Sean Lyngaas

Sean Lyngaas is CyberScoop’s Senior Reporter covering the Department of Homeland Security and Congress.

He was previously a freelance journalist in West Africa, where he covered everything from a presidential election in Ghana to military mutinies in Ivory Coast for The New York Times. Lyngaas’ reporting also has appeared in The Washington Post, The Economist and the BBC, among other outlets. His investigation of cybersecurity issues in the nuclear sector, backed by a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, won plaudits from industrial security experts. He was previously a reporter with Federal Computer Week and, before that, with Smart Grid Today.

Sean earned a B.A. in public policy from Duke University and an M.A. in International Relations from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

Government

Scammers impersonate Europol chief in an effort to defraud Belgians

by Sean Lyngaas • 1 month ago

It's a common, and often effective, tactic.

Government

New CISA director wants to spend less time cleaning up after big hacks, more time preparing for them

by Sean Lyngaas • 1 month ago

“We live in the glassiest of houses and we always need to keep that in mind,” Jen Easterly said in an interview.

Healthcare

Researchers show how to tamper with medication in popular infusion pumps using software flaws

by Sean Lyngaas • 1 month ago

The research illustrates the challenge of securing devices conceived decades ago from 21st-century digital threats.

Technology

Mozi botnet gets stealthier in infecting Huawei network gateways and other gear

by Sean Lyngaas • 1 month ago

Botnets are hard to sink, Part Infinity.

Financial

Ohio man pleads guilty to role in $300-million cryptocurrency laundering service

by Sean Lyngaas • 1 month ago

As law enforcement agencies get better at tracing cryptocurrency, such laundering services have grown in importance.

Healthcare

BlackBerry's popular operating system for medical devices affected by critical vulnerabilities, drawing fed warnings

by Sean Lyngaas • 1 month ago

The disclosure expands the number of devices that could be at risk due to the "BadAlloc" flaw.

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